paul slack impact of plague in tudor and stuart england pdf

Paul slack impact of plague in tudor and stuart england pdf

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“Fare-ill, England!”: Plague and Colonization in the Early Modern English Atlantic

‘A Broom in the Hand of the Almighty’: The Plague and the Unruly Poor

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Access options available:. Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences Modern histories are not lacking. Is there more that can usefully be said about this most famous pestilence? His first chapter provides a useful overview of bubonic plague in England from its reintroduction in the era of the Black Death in the s, through its establishment as a recurrent visitor, especially in London, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The three core chapters then present a detailed picture of the epidemic in London itself, its uneven spread out into the towns and occasional rural villages of the provinces, and the policy questions presented to national and city governments in their attempts to control the plague—or at the very least to alleviate its effects.

Rather than consider any primarily metaphysical or theological issues involving le mal , I shall be pondering the rather more material, physical, or corporal issues affecting the theme, and its repercussions for Anglo-French relations in and around the work of Shakespeare. To the more recent contributions belong G. Fabricius discusses a vast range of English Renaissance examples, but he is also acutely aware of the immediate European context. In doing so, I do not wish to establish that stereotyping took place, but how. I wish to study the unfavourable image formation, or stereotyping that accompanied the arrival of the new disease in England by looking at the intellectual origins of this tendency to stereotype, as well as the intertextual network of allusions it produced in the writings of the period. As a consequence, historians and literary critics would have us believe that it is not always easy to distinguish syphilis from the other ailments.

Combining historical research of the Tudor and Stuart periods with information sources and broadcast news as the epidemic in England unfolds in real time during lockdown, the areas of official guidance, epidemiology, social distancing and quarantine, financing measures, the national health service and fake news are compared. Then as now, limits on freedom of movement and congregation, social distancing and quarantine measures were applied for the sake of preserving life, loss of livelihood ameliorated by government loans and inconvenient opinions suppressed, and these suggest a commonality of organised responses to mass infection across times. Increased danger in certain necessary occupations and flight to second homes by the rich have been observed, health inequities uncovered and restrictions on being with the dying and burying the dead enforced. Wholly unprecedented in comparison with the past, when the wealthiest in a parish were taxed to pay for measures against plague, is the quarantining of the whole society and the financial package for workers on furlough to avoid mass unemployment. In the new normal after lockdown, people should be given more credit for sophisticated understanding than was allowed in past centuries, when fear and punishment coerced the majority to conform, and be allowed access to relevant information which will influence decisions about national and community life going forward after lockdown. This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

“Fare-ill, England!”: Plague and Colonization in the Early Modern English Atlantic

This is a classic study of a disease which had a profound impact in Tudor and Stuart England. Plague was both a personal affliction and a social calamity, regularly decimating urban populations. Paul Slack vividly describes the stresses which plague imposed on individuals, families, and whole communities, and the ways in which people tried to explain, control, and come to terms with it. Read more Table of contents. Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours. Finding libraries that hold this item

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Suggestions for further reading. This is only a selection from a large number of general and specialist studies available. Fuller bibliographies can be found in several of the works cited here, including the books by Biraben, Campbell and Poos. Bean , J. Benedictow , O. Plague in the late medieval Nordic Countries , Middelalderforlaget , Oslo , Beresford , M.

‘A Broom in the Hand of the Almighty’: The Plague and the Unruly Poor

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During the Great Plague of London , William Winstanley veered from his better known roles as arbiter of success and failure in his works of biography or as a comic author under the pseudonym Poor Robin, and instead engaged with his reading audience as a plague writer in the rare book The Christians Refuge: Or Heavenly Antidotes Against the Plague in this Time of Generall Contagion to Which is Added the Charitable Physician From its extensive paratexts, including a table of mortality statistics and woodcut of king death, to its temporal and providential interpretation of the disease between the covers of a single text, The Christians Refuge is a compendium of contemporary understanding of plague. Winstanley has long been seen as a biographer or as a humour writer; attributing The Christians Refuge extends and challenges previous perceptions of his work. The timely text, of which a well-thumbed copy of the rare book may be found in the Wellcome Library, London, tackles plague as its subject with gripping immediacy.

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Rather than consider any primarily metaphysical or theological issues involving le mal , I shall be pondering the rather more material, physical, or corporal issues affecting the theme, and its repercussions for Anglo-French relations in and around the work of Shakespeare. To the more recent contributions belong G. Fabricius discusses a vast range of English Renaissance examples, but he is also acutely aware of the immediate European context. In doing so, I do not wish to establish that stereotyping took place, but how. I wish to study the unfavourable image formation, or stereotyping that accompanied the arrival of the new disease in England by looking at the intellectual origins of this tendency to stereotype, as well as the intertextual network of allusions it produced in the writings of the period. As a consequence, historians and literary critics would have us believe that it is not always easy to distinguish syphilis from the other ailments.

The impact of plague in Tudor and Stuart England (Book

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