aging and health ezpenditure pdf

Aging and health ezpenditure pdf

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MeSH terms

Materials and Methods

Population Aging and Economic Growth: The Effect of Health Expenditure

Aristovnik, A. Baltagi, B. Health Economics, 26 7 , —

We estimate the pure effect of ageing on total health and aged care expenditure in Australia in the next 20 years. We use a simple demographic projection model for the number of people in older age groups along with a needs based estimate of changes in the public and private cost of care per person in each group adjusted for expected changes in morbidity. If people live longer without additional morbidity, then total health expenditure only grows at an average annual rate of 0. If only some of those additional years are in good health, then the average year on year growth is 1.

MeSH terms

Although the consequences of population aging for growth in health expenditures have been widely investigated, research on this topic is rather fragmented. Therefore, these consequences are not fully understood. This paper reviews the consequences of population aging for health expenditure growth in Western countries by combining insights from epidemiological and health economics research.

Based on a conceptual model of health care use, we first review evidence on the relationship between age and health expenditures to provide insight into the direct effect of aging on health expenditure growth. Second, we discuss the interaction between aging and the main societal drivers of health expenditures.

Aging most likely influences growth in health expenditures indirectly, through its influence on these societal factors. The literature shows that the direct effect of aging depends strongly on underlying health and disability. Commonly used approximations of health, like age or mortality, insufficiently capture complex dynamics in health. Population aging moderately increases expenditures on acute care and strongly increases expenditures on long-term care. The evidence further shows that the most important driver of health expenditure growth, medical technology, interacts strongly with age and health, i.

We therefore conclude that population aging will remain in the centre of policy debate. Further research should focus on the changes in health that explain the effect of longevity gains on health expenditures, and on the interactions between aging and other societal factors driving expenditure growth. This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution. Rent this article via DeepDyve.

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Materials and Methods

This paper revisits the debate on the 'red herring', viz. It decomposes HCE into seven components, includes both survivors and deceased individuals, and estimates a two-part model of the demand for health care services, using a large Swiss data set for It finds no or weak age effects on HCE for the components of HCE when proximity to death is controlled for, and points to differences between users and non-users of long-term care LTC. For deceased non-users of LTC services, a falling age curve for all components of HCE except for inpatient care is observed, while survivors show a weak age effect in ambulatory and inpatient care once proximity to death is controlled for. As to surviving users of LTC services, their probability of incurring LTC expenses markedly increases in old age, while most of the components of their conditional HCE show a decreasing age profile. Thus, a 'school of red herrings' can be claimed to exist-with the possible exception of LTC, where ageing might matter regardless of proximity to death. Abstract This paper revisits the debate on the 'red herring', viz.

Although the consequences of population aging for growth in health expenditures have been widely investigated, research on this topic is rather fragmented. Therefore, these consequences are not fully understood. This paper reviews the consequences of population aging for health expenditure growth in Western countries by combining insights from epidemiological and health economics research. Based on a conceptual model of health care use, we first review evidence on the relationship between age and health expenditures to provide insight into the direct effect of aging on health expenditure growth. Second, we discuss the interaction between aging and the main societal drivers of health expenditures. Aging most likely influences growth in health expenditures indirectly, through its influence on these societal factors.


Keywords: Ageing population, healthcare expenditure, China, India and ARDL model. 1. Introduction. Recently, a change in the.


Population Aging and Economic Growth: The Effect of Health Expenditure

Women face various health problems during their lives. This has an impact on health costs that must be paid. Gender bias tends to place women in subordinate positions, so they have limited power in making a decision. This study aimed to examine whether gender is a factor impacting health expenditures among the elderly.

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The effect of population aging on health expenditure growth: a critical review

Thomas E. To what extent can rising per capita health expenditures be attributed to the changing age composition of the population?

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