sift cupcake and dessert bar case study pdf

Sift cupcake and dessert bar case study pdf

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Essay Preview: Swot Analysis for Sift Cupcake and Dessert Bar

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Case Background Vision : Our vision is to become the premier cupcake shop in the San Francisco Bay Area Mission: Our mission is to deliver the OMG factor to all customers and give the most positive and memorable cupcake and dessert experience and most importantly, to make our customers fall in love with us. People will purchase More buyers; food to satisfy one joy bargaining power and pleasure weakens. Increased profit on the industry players : Stronger rivalry among competing sellers.

Essay Preview: Swot Analysis for Sift Cupcake and Dessert Bar

Momofuku Milk Bar. When Momofuku Noodle Bar opened in , we had no intention of ever serving desserts. We thought measuring out ingredients and baking was for wusses. We fooled around with an ill-advised and shortlived cupcake program for a second. Hiring a pastry chef was the furthest thing from my mind back in the day. Then I met Christina Tosi. The Department of Health had showed up at the restaurant and dumped bleach all over hundreds of dollars of pork belly we had stored in vacuum-sealed bags.

She quickly and singlehandedly saved us from DOH hell. She was running these kinds of plans for several top New York City restaurants at the time, which would have been a full-time job in itself for most people. But I realized Tosi was not like most people and that we had a lot in common; she burns the candle at both ends and takes a flamethrower to the middle.

Instead, she started organizing the company. Every day she came in to work she brought in something homemade—and amazing. Nothing tasted like it was made in a tiny Brooklyn apartment kitchen with no special ingredients and very little time. I would constantly say she. It seems like one day Tosi was writing up an HACCP plan and then she was making me promise never to buy desserts again for the restaurants. She had finally taken my hints about tackling a more culinary role at Momofuku.

Even though it was five years ago, it seems like five minutes ago. Tosi has many talents: she is a dog whisperer; she can consume more sugar than seemingly humanly possible without keeling over; she is the most stubborn person I know. Tosi reset the bar in terms of that theory. This is the story of how it came to be and where it is now as she guides it into unknown territories.

Resistance to her sugar manifesto is futile. David Chang. The best way to get through it is to just throw your hand out there and share. My name is Christina Tosi. I am twenty-nine. We opened Momofuku Milk Bar six days after my twenty-seventh birthday. I was born in Ohio and raised in Virginia. Both of my grandmothers are avid bakers, nurturing souls, and ferocious card sharks.

The matriarchs of my family bake for every occasion, large or small—birthday, bake sale, and, more often than not, just because. We are a kinship of sweet teeth on both sides of the family, some more refined and some more restrained than others. My father was known to substitute a chocolate ice cream cone for any meal of the day. My older sister and I were always allowed to help out in the kitchen. Like most kids, we would lick the beater from a batch of cookies.

But for me, it was never enough. I would shape one cookie and then eat a handful of dough, or just eat the dough shamelessly until my grandmother caught on and chided me in her strident countryOhio accent. She only invoked salmonella when I had managed to eat nearly an entire batch of cookie dough, which happened more often than I think she noticed. The old gals cut me off, and besides, it was high time I learned how to properly fend for myself.

I followed their same baking patterns. Baking was something that could, should, and did happen every day in my kitchen, too. Nothing went to waste and every baked good had character. In high school and college, I fell madly in love with math and foreign languages.

Baking was a hobby, not a profession. I worked at a restaurant while attending college in Virginia, waiting tables until they let me work as a morning prep cook.

While attending classes at the FCI by day, I worked as a hostess at Aquagrill by night to pay the rent and get a feel for a city restaurant. Soon after, I secured an externship that turned into a job at Bouley, under pastry chef Alex Grunert. And it kind of was, though after every hard day, I was ready to push it even further the next.

I tried dabbling in everything with any minute of free time. The city was all mine. I interned at Saveur magazine, because I thought I might want to be a food writer. I styled food and catered and consulted. I worked as a food runner at per se. But with each side job, I missed being in the kitchen. I was the girl who always brought cookies or a pie or a cake. For two consecutive summers, a dear friend managed to convince the powers that be at a conference center on Star Island, New Hampshire, to hire me to help run their bakery.

Breads and sweets for seven hundred people, three meals a day. Early mornings, late nights. I looked on the internet and found the French Culinary Institute. Sounded good. Their rigorous pastry arts program was six months long—perfect for an antsy, overachieving student like myself.

I was going to school to study pastry in New York City, I told my family and friends as I began to plan my move. As long as I could make the rent with a paying gig, I would work for free anywhere in my free time. Eventually they offered me a job. I respected the chef, Wylie Dufresne, enormously. His approach to food was thoughtful, reasonable, logical, scientific.

Every flavor pairing and composed dish had a purpose, an influence, and a level of independent thought that was revolutionary to my view of food.

I grew the most as a cook while working there. Wylie, sous-chef Mikey Sheerin, and Sam Mason, the pastry chef to whom I reported, challenged me daily.

Everything I cooked for family meal and everything I did to prep our pastry kitchen for service, setup, and breakdown was inspected, doublechecked. I just had to get out. I went back to Virginia first, spent time with the wonderful old gals in my life—Mom, Ang, my aunt Fran, my grandmas. I baked and I slept.

I went to Thailand. Then I was ready to go back. I was still a little too young and impressionable—and euphoric. I gave a quick head nod and let myself out of the office. I had no idea what I was going to do, but knew what I needed to do. We sold some shortcakes.

So the next day I made them again. I love me a good challenge, getting in on the ground floor and growing alongside everything and everyone else, moving and shaking, fighting an uphill battle—I love to organize, develop, figure it all out as a part of a team of believers. There was never a mention of kitchen work.

It was more office stuff, or tit shit, as Dave and I called it. I even worked the cash register! Looking back, I think he secretly had a plan all along—he just knew I needed some time to grow into it. I went to work, gave it my all, and came home to my oven and jars of sugar. Dave would shovel the sweets into his mouth and joke about how I should start making desserts for the restaurants.

We would laugh at how it would even happen. Who would plate desserts if we made them? And, more important, with a restaurant menu that was such a crazy hodgepodge of culinary approaches, what would we even serve? The idea of dessert seemed so far-fetched. One day I brought in a toasted-miso crack pie, and Dave started in again.

He started laughing and told me to go make a dessert for service that night. He stared back, now stern and slightly cold. Just make something. There were a lot of horrible mistakes that never made it to the menu. Some days I made five things that sucked. Then one day something would taste really good. And climbing up the hill became less painful than the downward spiral of failure. I knew I wanted to draw on my influences, from both professional kitchens and home cooking adventures, and find a balance between the two.

Mostly it was a challenge.

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Sift Cupcake and Dessert Bar is a unique shop that specializes in creative cupcakes and desserts. It began when Andrea Ballus had a vision for a shop that offered unique, creative cupcakes for her wedding. She noticed there was a void in this market in her area. Eventually Andrea decided to open up her own shop. The SWOT analysis is used to evaluate the progress, success, and faults of the company. The SWOT analysis is a strategic planning tool that evaluates the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of an organization.

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Vision Cupcake Delight, as a prime source of quality cupcakes in Davao City, envisions to continually serve the market with its finest products with virtuous customer service. It will strive to apply the total quality management in whole aspects of the organization in order to achieve the highest standards and expectations of the clienteles. Furthermore, Cupcake Delight will venture the desserts industry in the whole Philippines with its mission of delivering palatable and affordable products. Values Cupcake Delight is also designed to improve and enhance the values rooted from its creation. It believes that these values will be an essential part of its success. These include the areas of organization, human, society, economy, and politics. Goals Cupcake Delight intends to be in the right direction and to keep on the right track.


1 Full PDF related to this paper SIFT CUPCAKE AND DESSERT BAR BRANDON WILSON 1 The company that will Create a fun place to work, learn, and grow. In this case Sift is presented with three distinctly different options to decide a.


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Momofuku Milk Bar. When Momofuku Noodle Bar opened in , we had no intention of ever serving desserts. We thought measuring out ingredients and baking was for wusses. We fooled around with an ill-advised and shortlived cupcake program for a second. Hiring a pastry chef was the furthest thing from my mind back in the day.

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Cupcake Bouquet Marketing Plan

The cool air around us smelt with salt.

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Vision Cupcake Delight, as a prime source of quality cupcakes in Davao City, envisions to continually serve the market with its finest products with virtuous customer service. It will strive to apply the total quality management in whole aspects of the organization in order to achieve the highest standards and expectations of the clienteles. Furthermore, Cupcake Delight will venture the desserts industry in the whole Philippines with its mission of delivering palatable and affordable products. Values Cupcake Delight is also designed to improve and enhance the values rooted from its creation. It believes that these values will be an essential part of its success. These include the areas of organization, human, society, economy, and politics.

 Сьюзан, - сказал он торжественно.  - Здесь мы в безопасности. Нам нужно поговорить. Если Грег Хейл ворвется… - Он не закончил фразу. Сьюзан потеряла дар речи. Он пристально посмотрел на нее и постучал ладонью по сиденью соседнего стула. - Садись, Сьюзан.

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